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    Summer Term at Washington College

    Summer 2022 Header 

    Washington College is excited to offer a wide range of academic opportunities for undergraduate students, as well as high school students, working adults, and more. We will be offering in person and remote classes, to allow learners to access our exceptional programming from anywhere across the globe (although we are partial to the Chester River in the summer). No matter where you are joining us from, rest assured that you will discover rich opportunities to expand your academic horizons, enhance your skills, and experience an unparalleled liberal arts education. Continue building towards your future—join us this summer at WC.

     

    Cost of Attendance

    Tuition: $2,000 per course (Does not include additional fees such as room and board, student services, and health services)


    Financial Aid Information

    Tuition: $2,000 per course (Does not include additional fees such as room and board, student services, and health services)

    Deposit: $250 due on confirmation of seat in course

    Financial Aid Information

     

    Know what you are looking for?    

         

    Classes in Summer Term Module A are offered online, in person, and as hybrid (where students may elect either option). Be sure to look at the mode column to know which option the instructor has chosen when offering the course. These are 4 credit courses, unless otherwise noted.

    Classes are from May 31 - June 24, 2022, with no classes on June 20th (Emancipation Day). Course descriptions are provided lower on this page 

    Instructor's Name

    Course Name

    Course Title

    Time

    Mode

    LOC

    Friday Lab

    R.C. De Prospo

    Introduction to American Culture I

    AMS/ENG 209

    9-11:30

    Online

     

     

    Aaron Lampman

    Intro to Anthropology

    ANT 105

    12-2:30

    Online

     

     

    Julie Markin

    Archaeology Field School

    ANT 296

    Special times & days

    Regular

    Field Site

     

    Stephanie Brown

    Public Speaking

    CMS 150

    9:00-11:30

    Online

     

     

    Sarah Arradondo

    Quantitative Chemical Analysis w/Lab

    CHE 220

    3-5:30

    Regular

    TOLLS208

    3-6

    Sara Clarke-De Reza

    Educational Psychology

    EDU 252

    9-11:30

    Online

     

     

    Charlie Kehm

    Atmosphere, Ocean, and Environment

    ENV 141-10

    9-11:30

    Online

     

    9-12

    Dylan Poulsen

    Statistics

    MAT 109

    9-11:30

    Hyflex

    DUNN N103

     

    Ken Schweitzer

    Rock, Pop, & American Culture

    MUS 106

    12-2:30

    Online

     

     

    Joseph Prud'Homme

    Freedom in American Political Life

    POLS 394

    12-2:30

    Online

     

     

    LaRonika Thomas

    Hey Folks, Let’s Put On a Show!: An Introduction to Theatre

    THE 194

    12-2:30

    Online

     

     

    View Course Descriptions

          

     

    Classes in Summer Term Module B are offered online, in person, and as hybrid (where students may elect either option). Be sure to look at the mode column to know which option the instructor has chosen when offering the course. These are 4 credit courses, unless otherwise noted.

    Classes are from June 27 - July 22, 2022, with no classes on July 4th (Independence Day). Course descriptions are provided lower on this page 

    Instructor's Name

    Course Name

    Course Title

    Time

    Mode

    LOC

    Jason Patterson

    Introductory Drawing Studio

    ART 261

    3-5:30

    Regular

    LARR

    Michael Chiarappa

    SpTp: Field School: Doc AfAm Cultural Landscapes

    CRS 394

    Special Times & Days

    Regular

    Field Site

    Shaun Ramsey

    SpTp: Web Design and Technology

    CSI 194

    12-2:30

    Hyflex

    DUNN N103

    Jon McCollum

    Intro to World Music & Ethnomusicology

    MUS 104

    12-2:30

    Hyflex

    GCA 206

    Bin Song

    Confucianism and Ru Meditation

    PHL/REL 394

    3-5:30

    Hyflex

    SMTH 226

    Joseph Prud'homme

    Special Topics: Islam: A Detailed Introduction

    PHL/REL 294

    9-11:30

    Online

     

    View Course Descriptions

        

    Ready to Register?

    Learn how you can sign up today.

    You are a current Washington College student who has completed one or more semesters at Washington College.

    Congratulations on joining Goose Nation! We are delighted you want to start your collegiate career a semester early.

    You are a rising 9th-12th grader looking to get a jump start on college credits.

    You are a lifelong learner or working adult taking a course or two for personal enrichment or professional development

     

     

     

    Course Descriptions

    These courses descriptions are color coded to indicate whether there are offered in Module A (Maroon) or Module, B (Teal) and further coded to reflect whether the course is offered online, in person, or as a hybrid.
    Module A and B Icons in Maroon and Dark Teal

     

    Online Logo

    AMS/ENG 209 Introduction to American Literature and Culture I

    Monday-Thursday 9:00am-11:30am
    Instructor: DeProspo

    AMS/ENG 209 is gateway courses to the American Studies major at Washington College, counting both for Humanities General Education credit and prerequisite credit for American Studies.  The course is also writing intensive, its course work being exclusively a series of short papers.
     
    The American Studies major, the oldest cross-disciplinary major at Washington College, allows unusually independent students virtually to design their own majors, including both Social Science and Humanities courses that prepare students for careers in education, government, law, and social service, among others. It is exceptionally keyed to the College's historical heritage and provides students with all of the opportunities afforded by the Starr Center for the Study of the American Experience, in particular the Center's many paid internships. 

    Online Logo

    ANT 105: Intro to Anthropology

    Monday-Thursday 12:00-2:30
    Instructor: Lampman

    The study of human diversity with emphasis on cultural anthropology. Topics include the anthropological perspective, resources of culture, organization of material life, systems of relationships and global forms of inequality. The course examins how anthropologists apply their skills to solve contemporary human social problems. Basic ethnographic interviewing skills. Introduction to ethnography.

    Field School Icon

    ANT 296: Archaeology Field School

    Ever wonder what an 18th century tavern looked like? Curious about what people in the 1700s dropped into their toilets? Would an American Indian village feel familiar? Register for the Archaeological Field School to find out! The 6-credit summer class will teach you archaeological survey, excavation, and laboratory techniques and will provide networking opportunities with Maryland Historical Trust archaeologists and Archaeology Society of Maryland volunteers from a range of professions. 

    When May 18 - June 22, 2022  [5 weeks]

    Where: Barwick's Ordinary in Denton, MD [Caroline County]

    Cost: $2300.00 = includes tuition. fees. transportation, and equipment. On-campus housing can be secured through Residential Life but is not required

    Check out more info

    Students will register for ANT 296-10 [4 credits] and ANT 296-11 [2 credits]. Courses count for Social Science Distribution, the ANT major, and the ANT and MFCE [Museum, Field, and Community Education] minors.

     Email Dr. Julie Markin [jmarkin2@washcoll.edu] with questions or to register.

    In Person Icon

    ART 261: Introductory Drawing Studio

    Monday-Thursday 3:00-5:30
    Instructor: Patterson

    This course explores the theories and concepts of drawing from a contemporary perspective. The curriculum, while focusing on basic skills and concepts of drawing, is interdisciplinary in nature. In addition to drawing fundamentals, the course will place emphasis on connecting conceptual thinking to one's broader creative practice. Contemporary and historical examples of artists working within such a creative practice are covered through lectures and screenings. 

    In Person Icon

    CHE: 220: Quantitative Chemical Analysis w/Lab

    Monday-Thursday 3:00-5:30 Friday Lab 3:00-6:00
    Instructor: Arrandondo

    This one-semester course is intended to provide an introduction to analytical methods utilized in chemistry. Both classical and instrumental methods of analysis are considered. A detailed treatment of simple and complex chemical equilibria with particular emphasis on acid-base, oxidation-reduction, and precipitation equilibria is presented as a basis for the classical gravimetric and titrimetric methods. The instrumental techniques include electroanalytical, UV-visible molecular spectroscopy, atomic spectroscopy, and chromatography. Other topics include a review of intermolecular forces and states of matter. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory each week. Offered every semester. Prerequisite: Chemistry 120.

    Online Icon

    CMS 150: Public Speaking

    Monday-Thursday9:00-11:30
    Instructor: Brown

    Class presentations, job interviews, internships-pubic speaking is part of our everyday life. This course teaches students the main principles of public speaking; practice in composition, delivery, and criticism of informative, persuasive, and entertaining speeches. Particular attention is paid to speaking with media and public speaking in a digital world. Everyone needs to know how to do it and the sooner you learn the better!

    Field School Icon - Second Term

    CRS 394: SpTp: Field School: Doc AfAm Cultural Landscapes

    The Field School is open to undergraduate and graduate students, as well as life-long learners. Applicants should prepare a 1-2 page typewritten statement providing their contact information, relevant educational or occupational experience, and why they desire to participate in the field school. This information should be forwarded by email attachment to Dr. Michael Chiarappa at mchiarappa2@washcoll.edu or by regular mail to the address listed below.

    Application Details

    Hybrid Icon

    CSI 194:  Special Topics: Web Design and Technology

    Monday-Thursday 12:00-2:30
    Instructor: Ramsey

    This course covers the basics of the web development and web technologies from the ground up. We will explore the internet and internet connections. In specific, we will examine common web technologies and how our web browsers interact with the world wide web. You will gain practice in building webpages from scratch and investigating the inner workings of dynamic webpages.

    Online Icon

    EDU 252: Educational Psychology

    Monday-Thursday 9:00am-11:30am
    Instructor: Clarke-De Reza

    This course reflects knowledge derived from theory, research, and professional practice as it covers human development and learning, inquiry and research, and experience-based principles of effective practice. Such practice encourages: 1) intellectual, social, and personal development; 2) creating instructional opportunities adapted to diversity in learners, e.g. individual and cross-cultural developmental variability, approaches to learning, and multiple intelligences including spatial/artistic intelligence; 3) strategies for developing critical thinking, problem solving, and performance skills; and 4) formal and informal strategies for assessing intellectual, social, and physical development.  

    Online Icon

    ENV 141-10: Atmosphere, Ocean, and Environment

    Monday-Thursday 9:00-11:30 Friday Lab 9:00-12:00
    Instructor: Kehm

    This course examines processes and features that characterize the Earth’s surface. The course focuses on the major Earth systems of land (lithosphere), air (atmosphere), and water (hydrosphere) and explores how these systems evolve and interact through geologic time. Examples include studying global air circulation and its effect on weather, examining links between ocean currents and global climate, and exploring how stream processes help to shape landscape. The role of plate tectonics in driving the exchange of matter and energy between Earth systems is also a central theme. The course is designed to provide the necessary scientific and intellectual background for understanding a wide range of Earth phenomena, and to give students a greater appreciation for their natural environment. Includes three lecture hours per week plus lab. Prerequisite: ENV 140 or ENV 101

    Hyflex Icon

    MAT 109: Statistics

    Monday-Thursday 9:00-11:30
    Instructor: Poulsen

    Introduction to the appropriate methods for analyzing data and designing experiments. After a study of various measures of central tendency and dispersion, the course develops the basic principles of testing hypotheses, estimating parameters, and reaching decisions. Credit for MAT 109 will not be given if taken before or subsequently to BUS 109, PSY 209, or ECN 215.

    Hybrid Icon

    MUS/ANT 104: Intro to World Music and ethnomusciology

    Monday-Thursday 12:00-2:30
    Instructor: McCollum

    An introduction to music of the world, including popular, folk, religious and classical traditions. Explores the way ethnomusicologists organize and analyze knowledge about the world, while investigating the ways music acquires meaning in performances that are socially, historically, and culturally situated.

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    MUS 106: Rock, Pop, and American Culture

    Monday-Thursday 12:00-2:30
    Instructor: Schweitzer

    An examination of popular music in America from the 1830s through the modern day. With a particular emphasis being placed on the 1950s and 1960s, students will develop an understanding of the cultural, political, and economic forces of these eras and will examine how popular music history intersects with all aspects of American history and culture. This course also examines several important threads in popular music history, including the ever-present, but ever changing, role of race relations, the impact of evolving technologies, and the history of the music industry. In addition to reading the assigned textbook, students are also asked to watch/listen to important archival performances, televised interviews with notable musicians, radio interviews with scholars of popular culture, and other relevant primary sources.

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    PHL/REL 294: Special Topic: Islam: A Detailed Introduction

    Monday-Thursday 12:00-2:30
    Instructor: Prud'homme

    This course provides students a detailed introduction to the religion of Islam. Students read large segments of the Qur’an (the book of revelations to Muhammad), Hadith collections (accounts of Muhammad’s sayings and actions) and early Sira (biographies of Muhammad). Close examination is given to the Sunni-Shia division; the theological traditions and madahib (or schools of interpretation) in Sunni Islam, and the principles of Shiite theology; the development of the caliphate; Sufism or Islamic mysticism; Islam’s interaction with global religions; Islamic extremism; and contemporary Islamic writers re-conceptualizing the place of Islam in the contemporary world.  Special guest speakers from around the world enhance the learning experience.   

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    PHL/REL 394: Special Topic: Confucianism and Ru Meditation

    Monday-Thursday 3:00-5;30
    Instructor: Song

    This course introduces the philosophical concepts, sociological foundation, political implementation, and spiritual/religious practices of the Asian Ru (Confucian) tradition. While remaining sensitive to its varying characteristics through different historical periods, the course also presents Ruism’s development across Asian countries such as Korea, Japan, Vietnam and Indonesia, and studies its historical interaction with Western cultures. Students are encouraged to think over and practice Ruist insights in a broader context of philosophical and religious studies, while being able to compare it with other major Asian and Western philosophical and religious traditions. Special acquired skills: students will learn Meditation in Motion in its varying forms, such as breathing, sleeping, quiet-sitting and Taiji martial arts, to strengthen their mind-body general well-being and increase creativity and productivity.

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    POL 394: Freedom in America

    Monday-Thursday 12:00-2;30
    Instructor: Prud'homme

    This distinctive course explores the contested meanings of freedom in American political thought. We explore the historical origins of the American constitutional project; the defense of a system of self-government with freedom at its heart; and the various interpretations of freedom which have emerged in American legal and political theory.  Throughout the course we place our focus on the great ideas of freedom and their concrete instantiations in political and legal practice. Representative topics include economic freedom, state regulation, religious freedom, personal autonomy and civil rights and liberties. Students connect with leading experts enhancing the learning experience.

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    THE 194: Hey Folks, Let’s Put On a Show!: An Introduction to Theatre

    Monday-Thursday 12:00-2;30
    Instructor: Thomas
     
    Have you ever wondered how a live performance happens?  What do people have to know and do to put on a show?  This course is designed as a hands-on exploration of the world of theatre and performance.  Throughout the semester we will study the various roles within the theatre, including that of the actor, designer, director, playwright, and dramaturg.  Each student will have the opportunity to engage these roles in direct ways through various creative projects.  This class emphasizes curiosity, exploration, and collaboration.  Additionally, students will be introduced to a brief overview of theatre history and literature as a companion study with the various theatrical roles being explored.  The class culminates in a creative group project in which each member will take on one of the above roles for a specific play assigned to their group.  By the end of the course, students will be able to define and practice the roles of each theatrical profession, understand how to read a play critically, understand how to view, discuss, and write about a performance critically, and develop an understanding of the importance of theatre and performance as a cultural form.

     

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    registrar@washcoll.edu
    Bunting Hall, lower level

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    wc_admissions@washcoll.edu
    410-778-7700
    Casey Academic Center

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    fa_office@washcoll.edu 
    410-778-7214
    Casey Academic Center